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Posted by on Wednesday, February 10, 2010 at 10:11pm.

Five Top Strategies to Keep Students Learning in a Calm Classroom Environment

Strategy number 5 – Keep the lesson moving.(Classroom Expectations and Procedures for Two Different Age Groups )

(Time-Management Strategies for Continuity) If you have a forty-five minute period, plan three different activities. Try to get them up out of their seats at least once during the class period. Those students with pent up energy will thank you for it


does that look ok? i am still lost sorry

  • aed - , Wednesday, February 10, 2010 at 10:18pm

    Yes. It looks great.

    However, it doesn't really apply to classroom expectations. Please go back and look at the example I posted for classroom expectations.

    Don't forget though, that you have to tell which two age groups you've chosen and give more specifics for each age group.

  • aed update - , Wednesday, February 10, 2010 at 10:29pm

    i will list for the classroom expectations then Time-Management Strategies for Continuity can u see if i am correct plz

    Keep the lesson moving= If you have a forty-five minute period, plan three different activities. Try to get them up out of their seats at least once during the class period. Those students with pent up energy will thank you for it.

    Don’t lecture for the whole period= Students who are actively engaged in a learning
    activity are generally not disrupting the class. Hands-on activities work great for vivacious classrooms.

    Talk to your students= If you see them in the hall, in the cafeteria or at the grocery store, ask them how they are. If you see a student in the local newspaper, congratulate them. If they do something nice, tell them that you appreciate their kindness. This lets them know that you really do care about them.

    When students are being disruptive by talking, poking, pulling or crumpling paper, go stand by them=This sends them a direct message to stop what they are doing. Most of the time they stop and get back to work

    When you have stood by the student, talked to the student and kept them busy with lessons, and they still are disruptive, take them in the hallway.= Ask them, “Are you OK?” It has been my experience that they crumble and tell you that they had a fight with their parents, didn’t get up on time or are having other issues. If they are defiant, send them on to the principal.



    i honestly don't think i am correct

  • aed - , Wednesday, February 10, 2010 at 10:37pm

    Great!

  • aed updated again - , Wednesday, February 10, 2010 at 10:45pm

    would a Classroom Expectations and Procedures for Two Different Age Groups= be on time, no talking in class, being prepared, pay attention

  • aed - , Wednesday, February 10, 2010 at 10:50pm

    Yes. But be sure you can enforce each one. For instance, "no talking in class" is impossible to enforce -- nor does a good teacher really want to enforce it all the time. Perhaps you mean "no talking when someone is addressing the class." Perhaps you could say "no talking during tests and quizzes."

    Again -- consider different age groups. For younger children (and maybe older ones) you could simply say "do your homework."

  • aed - , Wednesday, February 10, 2010 at 10:54pm

    when i say no talking during tests and quizzes for classroom expectations... would only talk when your addressed (would that would for time management)

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