Saturday
March 25, 2017

Post a New Question

Posted by on .

How does Shakespeare use foreshadowing in the first 4 acts of Romeo and Juliet? I just need some examples

Thanks
-MC

  • Literature - ,

    Do you know what foreshadowing means?

  • Literature - ,

    Yes.

    -MC

  • Literature - ,

    I got this from sparknotes:

    foreshadowing · The Chorus’s first speech declaring that Romeo and Juliet are doomed to die and “star-crossed.” The lovers’ frequent thoughts of death: “My grave is like to be my wedding bed” (Juliet, I.v.132). The lovers’ thoughts of suicide, as when Romeo threatens to kill himself after killing Tybalt. Friar Lawrence’s warnings to behave moderately if Romeo and Juliet wish to avoid tragedy: “These violent delights have violent ends . . . Therefore love moderately” (II.v.9–14). The lovers’ mutual impression that the other looks pale and deathlike after their wedding night (III.v). Juliet’s faked death by Friar Lawrence’s potion. Romeo’s dream-vision of Juliet kissing his lips while he is dead (V.i). Romeo’s outbursts against fate: “O, I am fortune’s fool!” (III.i.131) and “Then I defy you, stars” (V.i.24).


    I'm not sure what the scenes in the parenthesis are though..a little help?

    Thanks
    -MC

  • Literature - ,

    The notations in parentheses are telling you what act, scene, and lines the quoted material comes from -- so you can go back into the play and read the whole passage, not just a few words.

    http://www.answers.com/foreshadow

    Let us know what you think.

  • Literature - ,

    (II.v.9–14) = Act II, scene 5, lines 9-14

  • Literature - ,

    The paretheses are the acts and scenes where the quote is taken from
    (Juliet, I.v.132). Juliet's speech from Act I, scene 5, line 132.

    Whenever one uses a quote, one must tell where that quote came from.
    .

Answer This Question

First Name:
School Subject:
Answer:

Related Questions

More Related Questions

Post a New Question