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Honors Chemistry (check answers)

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On a worksheet we got, we have to balance out chemical reaction equations then define what kind of reaction it is (synthesis, decomposition, single/double-replacement). Would someone be willing to check my answers, please? Thanks!!

1. c) BaO + H2O ==> ________ (synthesis)

==> For this, I put the product to be BaH2O2.

3. c) H2SO4 + KOH ==> ________ (double-replacement)

==> For this, I put the product to be H2OH + KOSO4, but this doesn't sound right at all. :-/

4. a) CH4 + O2 ==> CO2 + H2O

==> This reaction looks like it could be a double-replacement reaction, but I'm not entirely sure. Anyone have a guess?

  • Honors Chemistry (check answers) -

    1. c) BaO + H2O ==> ________ (synthesis)

    ==> For this, I put the product to be BaH2O2.
    BaH2O2 is correct but I would write is as Ba(OH)2 to make it more recognizable. Synthesis is correct.

    3. c) H2SO4 + KOH ==> ________ (double-replacement)

    ==> For this, I put the product to be H2OH + KOSO4, but this doesn't sound right at all. :-/
    You're right. It doesn't sound right nor does it look right. Double displacement is ok. In a double displacement, just switch + and - ions. So K goes with SO4 and H goes with OH. Now you can worry about what the formula for these compounds is. K and SO4 must be K2SO4 while H and OH must be HOH or H2O. I think you are making a mistake in trying to make the formula match the number of atoms and that isn't the way to do it. First, you switch ions. Second you determine the formula (using valences or the periodic table and not the number of atoms). Third, and final step is to balance.
    H2SO4 + KOH ==> K2SO4 + H2O
    Now balance it.
    H2SO4 + 2KOH ==> K2SO4 + 2H2O
    (Some would call this an acid/base reaction.)


    4. a) CH4 + O2 ==> CO2 + H2O

    ==> This reaction looks like it could be a double-replacement reaction, but I'm not entirely sure. Anyone have a guess?
    You don't have it listed in the preamble of your question but this is a combustion reaction. Also, it is an oxidation-reduction (redox) reaction.

  • Honors Chemistry (check answers) -

    Ohhhh, I think I get what you mean. Thanks!! :)

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