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Posted by on Tuesday, October 20, 2009 at 1:10am.

I am looking for the correct sentence use of the Semicolon
20a. The Bears lost the Super Bowl to Indianapolis; worse yet, I lost a bet with my brother about the outcome of the game.
20b. The Bears lost the Super Bowl to Indianapolis; worse yet; I lost a bet with my brother about the outcome of the game.
I say the answer is B because worse yet is considered a transition word.

  • english - , Tuesday, October 20, 2009 at 7:56am

    No, the correct sentence is a.

    Semicolons are used to separate EQUAL things, primarily independent clauses. The words "worse yet" are simply transitional, as you said, but they do not make up a complete independent clause.

    Semicolons: http://grammar.ccc.commnet.edu/grammar/marks/semicolon.htm

    Commas: http://grammar.ccc.commnet.edu/grammar/commas.htm See #3

    Scroll almost all the way down and read about conjunctive adverbs: http://grammar.ccc.commnet.edu/grammar/adverbs.htm

  • english - , Tuesday, October 20, 2009 at 11:02pm

    Thank you very much! I have always not been good at English.

  • english - , Tuesday, October 20, 2009 at 11:09pm

    Ok DO you mind checking if I got these correct.

    a. I just bought CDs by Regina Spektor, John Legend, and Prince.

    b. I just bought: CDs by Regina Spektor, John Legend, and Prince.

    I picked B becaus d suffices fine for this.

    a. Students, who study hard, should do well on the test.
    b. Students who study hard should do well on the test.

    I picked B because it didn't need any correction

    a. After sliding into second base 24a. Alex realized the outfielder had dropped the ball.

    b. After sliding into second base, Alex realized the outfielder had dropped the ball.

    I picked B because the after makes a better sentence.

    a. Bob enjoys playing football, and Jim enjoys playing hockey.

    b. Bob enjoys playing football and Jim enjoys playing hockey.

    I picked B because they are saying pretty much the same thing.

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