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August 30, 2014

Homework Help: college CRT 205

Posted by Melissa on Friday, October 2, 2009 at 3:55pm.

Source 1 Title and Citation: Individuals can help reduce child abuse and neglect. Source Citation:Information, National Clearinghouse on Child Abuse and Neglect. "Individuals Can Help Reduce Child Abuse and Neglect." Child Abuse. Ed. Lucinda Almond. Current Controversies Series. Detroit: Greenhaven Press, 2006. Opposing Viewpoints Resource Center. Gale. Apollo Library. 2 Oct. 2009
Identify the principal issue presented by the source. child abuse and neglect: how to prevent or reduce it

Identify any examples of bias presented by the author. If none exist, explain how you determined this.
I did not find any examples of bias presented by the author. The author stated facts, the only other thing included were questions for we (the readers) to ask ourselves.
Identify any areas that are vague or ambiguous. If none exist, explain how you determined this.
Once again, the author included facts, I did not find any vague or ambiguous points.
Do you find the source credible? Explain your reasoning.
Yes, very I believe the facts to be true and therefore, trust the author.
Identify and name any rhetorical devices used by the author. If none exist, explain how you determined this.
I did not find any use of any rhetorical devices. The author used simple facts, and common sense to write this paper.
Identify and name any fallacies used by the author. If none exist, explain how you determined this.
No fallacies found again. Simple facts were stated, the author used rhetorical questions to ask yourself to persuade his or hers point.
State one argument made by the author.
The author argued that we (as people and pointed to we as Americans) can help when we see a child that we think may be being abused, could be abused in the future, or may have been abused in the past.
Identify the premises and conclusion of the argument.
Premise: As an individual and as a member of your community, you have the power to prevent child abuse and neglect
Conclusion: Finally—and most important if you are a parent—remember that prevention, like most positive things, begins at home. Take time to re-evaluate your parenting skills. Be honest with yourself—are you yelling at your children a lot or hitting them? Do you enjoy being a parent at least most of the time? If you could benefit from some help with parenting, seek it—getting help when you need it is an essential part of being a good parent. Talk to a professional that you trust; take a parenting class; read a book about child development. Contact the resources to locate places that parents can get help.
Is the author’s argument valid or invalid, sound or unsound, strong or weak? Explain how you determined this. I think the authors argument is valid, sound and very strong because it is true, these are facts said by many doctors, and facts stated in many psychology books.
Does the author use moral reasoning? If not, explain how you determined this.
Yes the author uses moral reasoning, it comes out in the questions that are asked towards the end of the paper.

This is the article I chose: Individuals Can Help Reduce Child Abuse and Neglect

Table of Contents: Further Readings
The National Clearinghouse on Child Abuse and Neglect Information was established in 1974 by the Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act to collect, organize, and disseminate information on all aspects of child maltreatment.
The National Clearinghouse on Child Abuse and Neglect Information was established in 1974 by the Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act to collect, organize, and disseminate information on all aspects of child maltreatment.
As an individual and as a member of your community, you have the power to prevent child abuse and neglect. Here are some ways to contribute your ounce—or more—of effort to prevention.
Understanding, Support, and Activism
• Understand the problem. Child abuse and neglect affect children of all ages, races, and incomes. According to the National Child Abuse and Neglect Data System (NCANDS), in 2003, an estimated 906,000 children nationwide were victims of maltreatment. Most experts believe that actual incidents of abuse and neglect are more numerous than statistics indicate.
• Understand the terms. Child abuse and neglect take more than one form. Federal and State laws address four main types of child maltreatment: physical abuse, physical or emotional neglect, sexual abuse, and emotional abuse. Often more than one type of abuse or neglect occurs within families. Some types of maltreatment, such as emotional abuse, are much harder to substantiate than others, such as physical abuse.
• Understand the causes. Most parents don't hurt or neglect their children intentionally. Many were themselves abused or neglected. Very young or inexperienced parents might not know how to take care of their babies or what they can reasonably expect from children at different stages of development. Circumstances that place families under extraordinary stress—for instance, poverty, divorce, sickness, disability—sometimes take their toll in child maltreatment. Parents who abuse alcohol or other drugs are more likely to abuse or neglect their children.
• Support programs that support families. Parent education, community centers, respite care services, and substance abuse treatment programs help to protect children by addressing circumstances that place families at risk for child abuse and neglect. Donate your time or money, if you can.
• Report suspected abuse and neglect. Some States require everyone to report suspected abuse or neglect; others specify members of certain professions, such as educators and doctors. But whether or not you are mandated by law to report child abuse and neglect, doing so may save a child—and a family. If you suspect a child is being abused or neglected, call the police or your local child welfare agency.
• Spread the word. Help educate others in your community about child abuse and neglect.... Ask if you can leave a stack of brochures [on child abuse] at your local public library, recreation or community center, government center, or other public place. You also might make material available at your church, synagogue, mosque, temple, or other faith institutions. Even grocery stores usually have places to distribute community materials.
• Strengthen the fabric of your community. Know your neighbors' names and the names of their children, and make sure they know yours. Give stressed parents a break by offering to watch their children. Volunteer. If you like interacting with children, great, but you do not have to volunteer directly with kids to contribute to prevention. All activities that strengthen communities, such as service to civic clubs and participation on boards and committees, ultimately contribute to the well-being of children.
• Be ready in an emergency. We've all witnessed the screaming-child-in-the-supermarket scenario. If we are parents, at least once that screaming child has been ours. Most parents take the typical tantrum in stride. But what if you witness a scene—in the supermarket or anywhere else—where you believe a child is being, or is about to be, physically or verbally abused? Responding in these circumstances technically moves beyond prevention to intervention, and intervention is best handled by professionals. Still, if you find yourself in a situation where you believe a child is being or will be abused at that moment, there are steps you can take. Prevent Child Abuse America suggests the following:
• Talk to the adult to get their attention away from the child. Be friendly.
• Say something like, "Children can really wear you out, can't they?" or "My child has done the same thing."
• Ask if you can help in any way—could you carry some packages? Play with an older child so the baby can be fed or changed? Call someone on your cell phone?
• If you see a child alone in a public place—for example, unattended in a grocery cart—stay with the child until the parent returns.
Finally—and most important if you are a parent—remember that prevention, like most positive things, begins at home. Take time to re-evaluate your parenting skills. Be honest with yourself—are you yelling at your children a lot or hitting them? Do you enjoy being a parent at least most of the time? If you could benefit from some help with parenting, seek it—getting help when you need it is an essential part of being a good parent. Talk to a professional that you trust; take a parenting class; read a book about child development. Contact the resources to locate places that parents can get help.

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