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Posted by on Wednesday, July 1, 2009 at 9:43pm.

which is not an example of an idiom found in "Miss Rosie"?
a. "when I watch you"
b. "[you] used to be called"
c. "waiting for your mind"
d. "I stand up"

i remember asking this before a long time ago...i think someone siad both a and b are correct, but that can't be. there has to be one right answer. pleaseee help me

  • English - , Wednesday, July 1, 2009 at 9:50pm

    http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/idiom
    Definition #1.

    Which is the only answer choice that fits?

  • english - , Wednesday, July 1, 2009 at 9:55pm

    i'm not sure

  • English - , Wednesday, July 1, 2009 at 10:28pm

    There is only one answer choice that is not absolutely flat-out literal -- that is, in which the words are not according to their literal dictionary definitions. Which ONE is that?

    If you're not sure, look up all the major words:
    http://www.dictionary.com

  • english - , Wednesday, July 1, 2009 at 10:43pm

    Here's the poem.

    "when I watch you
    wrapped up like garbage
    sitting, surrounded by the smell
    of too old potato peels
    or
    when I watch you
    in your old man's shoes
    with the little toe cut out
    sitting, waiting for your mind
    like next week's grocery
    I say
    when I watch you
    you wet brown bag of a woman
    who used to be the best looking gal in Georgia
    used to be called the Georgia Rose
    I stand up
    through your destruction
    I stand up"

    Since you're looking for the ONE phrase that is NOT an idiom, your first answer -- either a or b -- could be correct. However, it seems that a is the most factual and literal expression -- so it must not be an idiom in this poem.

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