Post a New Question

English

posted by on .

1. He should not make a noise.
2. He should not make noise.
3. He should not make much noise.
4. He should not make many noises.

(Which ones are correct? Are all correct?)

5. He was the best student of his
class.

6. He was the best student in his
class.

7. He was at the top of his class.
8. He was at the top in his class.

(Are the four sentences the same? Can we use both 'of' and 'in'?)

9. In the diary we read about her joys and sorrows.

10.In the diary we read about her joy and sorrow.

(Which one is correct? Are both OK?)

11. Why do men make war?
(What does 'men' mean here? Does 'men' mean adult male human being? Or does 'men' mean people?)

  • English - ,

    1-4 all correct although one is less apt to say #4.
    #5-8 either of or in, but more likely to say in
    9 and 10 both are correct.
    11. men usually means adult male human beings

    men = plural of man
    Main Entry: man !man
    Pronunciation: \ ˈman, in compounds ˌman or mən \
    Function: noun
    Inflected Form(s): plural men!men \ ˈmen, in compounds ˌmen or mən \ ,
    Etymology: Middle English, from Old English man, mon human being, male human; akin to Old High German man human being, Sanskrit manu
    Date: before 12th century
    Results
    1 a (1). 1 a (1) an individual human especially an adult male human (2) . (2) a man belonging to a particular category (as by birth, residence, membership, or occupation) - usually used in combination - councilman (3) . (3) husband (4) . (4) lover b. b the human race : humankind c. c a bipedal primate mammal (Homo sapiens) that is anatomically related to the great apes but distinguished especially by notable development of the brain with a resultant capacity for articulate speech and abstract reasoning, is usually considered to form a variable number of freely interbreeding races, and is the sole living representative of the hominid family broadly any living or extinct hominid d (1). d (1) one possessing in high degree the qualities considered distinctive of manhood (2) . (2) obsolete the quality or state of being manly : manliness e. e fellow chap - used as mode of familiar address f. f - used interjectionally to express intensity of feeling - man, what a game
    2 a. 2 a individual person - a man could get killed there b. b the individual who can fulfill or who has been chosen to fulfill one's requirements - she's your man
    3 a. 3 a a feudal tenant : vassal b. b an adult male servant c. c plural the working force as distinguished from the employer and usually the management
    4 a. 4 a one of the distinctive objects moved by each player in various board games b. b one of the players on a team
    5. 5 an alumnus of or student at a college or university - a Bowdoin man
    6. 6 Christian Science the compound idea of infinite Spirit : the spiritual image and likeness of God : the full representation of Mind
    7. 7 often capitalized police - when I heard the siren, I knew it was the Man - American Speech
    8. 8 often capitalized the white establishment : white society - surprise that any black…should take on so about The Man - Peter Goldman
    9. 9 one extremely fond of or devoted to something specified - strictly a vanilla ice cream man
    Phrases
    1. as one man with the agreement and consent of all : unanimously
    2. one's own man free from interference or control : independent
    3. to a man without exception

    Sra

  • English - ,

    1. He should not make a noise.
    2. He should not make noise.
    3. He should not make much noise.
    4. He should not make many noises.

    (Which ones are correct? Are all correct?)
    All are correct, but they mean different things. The first two basically mean that he should be silent. 3 and 4 mean that he should be nearly silent!

    5. He was the best student of his
    class.
    6. He was the best student in his
    class.
    7. He was at the top of his class.
    8. He was at the top in his class.

    (Are the four sentences the same? Can we use both 'of' and 'in'?)
    5, 6, and 7 are fine; 8 is not. In 5 and 6, it doesn't matter which preposition you use, but it does with the expression in 7 and 8. The word "in" doesn't fit there.

    9. In the diary we read about her joys and sorrows.
    10.In the diary we read about her joy and sorrow.

    (Which one is correct? Are both OK?)
    Both are OK.

    11. Why do men make war?
    (What does 'men' mean here? Does 'men' mean adult male human being? Or does 'men' mean people?)
    In that phrasing in today's world, the word "men" is referring to human beings in general. I'm sure it is phrasing that began way back when only men fought in wars!!

  • English - ,

    #'s 1-4 are all correct but have different meanings.

    #6 is the better sentence. However both #5 & #6 are correct.

    Both #7 and #8 are correct. But they have different meanings.

    #'s 9 and 10 are both correct. The difference between the two is a matter of how many joys and sorrows.

    #11. The meaning of that sentence would depend on context. It could mean only the males, or it could refer to man-kind. So, one would have to read the whole purpose of the paragraph to get the meaning.

Answer This Question

First Name:
School Subject:
Answer:

Related Questions

More Related Questions

Post a New Question