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March 24, 2017

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I'm not exactly sure how to do this problem

The Earth has a radius of 6.37E6 meters. Draw a picture and calculate:
- The circumference of the Earth
- The time for one rotation of the earth in seconds
- The velocity of someone standing on the equator
- The centripetal acceleration of someone standing on the equator
- How does this compare to the value of "g"?

- The centripetal acceleratorion of someone standing on the North or South Pole
- What is the centripetal acceleration of someone in Connecticuit? (latidute 43 degrees)

Ok I hav no idea how to do the last one or anyone of them

is the radius radius from the sun the problem dosne't say

I think I'm assuming that it takes 365 days for one rotation aroudn the sun correct?

The north pole and south pole isn't moving right just rotating?

Please show me step by step using proper problem solving methodology to answer the questions so that way I can understand how you got the answers

thanks

  • Physics - ,

    The sun is not involved in this problem, only the earth.

    The earth does not rotate around the sun. Rotate means to spin around once on its own axis. The earth revolves around the sun in a year, but rotates around its own axis every ~24 hours.

    1) They give you the radius, and the formula for circumference for a circle (which the earth approximate) is C = 2(pi)r. Just plug and chug.

    2) The earth rotates once around its axis every 24 hours (or thereabouts: I assume you will be allowed to use 24 hours). How many seconds are there in 24 hours?

    3) The velocity (speed may be a better term, since after one day, the velocity would be 0 since there would be no displacement, whereas there would be ~25,000 miles of distance) for someone standing at the equator would be the distance traveled over the time elapsed. It takes 24 hours to complete one rotation, so just find the distance around the equator and divide 24 hours by it.

    The rest I'd have to refresh myself on so I won't address them.

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