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Posted by on Saturday, April 25, 2009 at 5:00am.

1. Fold the paper along the dotted line to make a triangle.(Right?)

2. It will heat the floor.
It will warm the floor.
(Are both OK?)

3. Don't throw stones at the dogs.
Don't throw stones to the dogs.
(Are both prepositions OK? What is the difference?)

4. The scarf has many colors. In other words, it is colorful.

4-1. The scarf has many colors. That is, it is colorful.

4-2. The scarf has many colors. So to speak, it is colorful.

4-3. The scarf has many colors. That is to say, it is colorful.

4-4. The scarf has many colors. Namely, it is colorful.

4-5. The scarf has many colors. To wit, it is colorful.

4-6. The scarf has many colors. Or, it is colorful.

(Are all the expressions the same and correct? Which ones are commonly used?)

5. Where is your answer sheet?
5-1. Where is your answer paper?
5-2. Where is your answer piece?

(Are the expressions all correct and the same? Situation:When a student take a test in a classroom)

6. Is a numeral a quantifier?
Does a quantifier include a numeral?

Are the following all quantifiers:smome, any, no, all, every, two, there, first, second.

(Please answer the questions.)

  • English - , Saturday, April 25, 2009 at 8:49am

    1. right

    2. Both are OK, yes.

    3. Use the preposition "at" if you mean you're trying to make the dogs go away. Use the preposition "to" if you want the dogs to play and bring them back to you!

    4 and 4-1 are the best. The others are OK, but not commonly used.

    5 is correct; the others are not commonly used.

    6. Numerals are generally not used as quantifiers, but the first two sentences in 6 are phrased correctly. The third question is phrased correctly, but 1) put a space after the colon, correct the spelling of "some," and put a question mark at the end.

    Here's a really good page (with a couple of quizzes at the bottom) explaining about quantifiers:
    http://grammar.ccc.commnet.edu/grammar/determiners/determiners.htm

  • English - , Saturday, April 25, 2009 at 10:09am

    In 4-5, since "To wit" is a synonym for "Namely" I don't believe you will hear that much.

    Sra

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