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COLLEGE MATH. Please Help

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According to the New York Times/CBS poll of March, 2005, 87% agreed that it should be the government's responsibility to provide a decent standard of living for the elderly, and 54% agreed that it would be a good idea to invest part of their Social Security taxes on their own.

What is the smallest percentage of people who could have agreed with both statements?

What is the largest percentage of people who could have agreed with both statements?

  • COLLEGE MATH. Please Help - ,

    perhaps I am missing something but
    wouldn't the smallest percentage possible of people agreeing with both statements be 0% ?
    and the largest percentage possible agreeing with both parts be 54% ?

  • COLLEGE MATH. Please Help - ,

    The 54% is correct but it says the smallest percent is incorrect

  • COLLEGE MATH. Please Help - ,

    try this:
    n(A or B) = n(A) + n(B) - n(A and B)
    = .87 + .54 - n(A and B)
    = 1.41 - n(A and B)

    since we can't go over 100%
    the n(A and B) must be .41 or 41% ????

  • COLLEGE MATH. Please Help - ,

    yes that is correct. thank you!

  • COLLEGE MATH. Please Help - ,

    I need help in graphing this function in Ms Excel by plot in points in the chart in part b and label the axes?
    with the time on the x-axis and population on the y-axisb) Fill in the following chart. Round to the nearest whole person when necessary.

    Year (t) Population (P)

    t = 0
    (2010) 6,000 7,000 8,000 9,000

    t = 1
    (2011) 3,000 3,500 4,000 4,500
    t = 2
    (2012) 2,000 2,334 2,667 3,000
    t = 3
    (2013) 1,500 1,750 2,000 2,250
    t = 6
    (2016) 857 1,000 1,143 1,286



    c) Use your equation from part a) to approximate how many years it would take for the population to reach 400. Round to two decimal places if necessary.

    Answer: t = 14 years t = 16.5 years t = 19 years t = 21.5 years

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