Thursday
December 18, 2014

Homework Help: Latin

Posted by Jeremy on Monday, March 16, 2009 at 8:23pm.

In what instances do you use the nominative for the word preceding "of the," in oppose to the genitive. For example, in some of my sentences, I have the nominative, like "Forma terrae in Sicilia plana non est." But other times, it is genitive "Curae puellarum parvae sunt." Are there any rules to help me remember when you use what like in the two examples above? Thank you!

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