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English

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1. Without rules, people cannot get along with others.
1-1. If there were no rules, people cannot get along with others.
1-2. If they have no rules, people cannot get along with others.

(Does # 1 mean #1-1 or #1-2? Does 'get' mean 'go'? What is the meaning of 'get along with'?)

2. Drivers sometimes can't see you.
2-1. Drivers can't sometimes see you.

(Is 2-1 wrong?)

3. Bikes are vehicles, just like cars and trucks.
3-1. Bikes are vehicles, like just cars and trucks.
(Are both OK?)

4. Look back and watch out for vehicles.
4-1. Look back and be careful about vehicles.
4-2. Look back and look out for vehicles.

(Are the three all the same?)

5. Keep down close to the floor.

(Keep is an intransitive verb. Down is an adverb. Close to is a prepositional phrase. The floor is a noun phrase.
Are the above right? What is the meaning of 'keep' in this sentence?)

6. NEVER re-enter a burning building.
6-1. NEVER reenter a burning building.
6-2. NEVER re-enter a building which is burning.
(Can we use both 're-enter' and ' reenter'? Does 6-2 is also grammatical?)

  • English - ,

    1. Without rules, people cannot get along with others.
    1-1. If there were no rules, people could not get along with others.
    1-2. If they have no rules, people could not get along with others.

    (Does # 1 mean #1-1 or #1-2? Does 'get' mean 'go'? What is the meaning of 'get along with'?)
    All three essentially mean the same thing. To "get along with" is an idiomatic expression, not always explainable! Here are a good website to help you with idioms:
    http://www.usingenglish.com/reference/idioms/
    You can find others by just putting english idioms into www.google.com.


    2. Drivers sometimes can't see you.
    2-1. Drivers can't sometimes see you.

    (Is 2-1 wrong?) 2 is better than 2-1; even better would be this: Sometimes drivers can't see you.

    3. Only 3 is correct; 3-1 is not used.

    4. All three are about the same, but 4 is the one most commonly used.

    5. Keep down close to the floor.

    (Keep is an intransitive verb. Down is an adverb. Close to is a prepositional phrase. The floor is a noun phrase.
    Are the above right? What is the meaning of 'keep' in this sentence?)
    Almost all are correct; "close" is also an adverb; "to" is the preposition; in addition to being a noun, "floor" is also the object of the preposition "to." In this sentence, "keep" means "stay."

    6. NEVER re-enter a burning building.
    6-1. NEVER reenter a burning building.
    6-2. NEVER re-enter a building which is burning.
    (Can we use both 're-enter' and ' reenter'? Does 6-2 is also grammatical?)
    All three are fine; I've seen both "re-enter" and "reenter" but I think the one with the hyphen helps people read the word correctly the first time!

    =)

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