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Chemistry

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How do you find molar mass?

  • Chemistry - ,

    Look up the atomic masses on the periodic table OR look in a table for the elements. An example:
    CaCO3.
    Ca = approximately 40
    C = approximately 12
    O = approximately 16 and 16 x 3 = 48.
    Then add all of them.
    40 + 12 + 48 = approximately 100. I just rounded all of them to make it a little easier for you to see.
    http://www.webelements.com/
    Here is a table on the web if you don't have one.

  • Chemistry - ,

    Thank you! but what about for a molar mass for a single element? my teacher said it is different from the atomic mass, but all the research i've done says it is not different.

  • Chemistry - ,

    You are right. Atomic masses are the masses you see in the table or on the periodic chart. I suspect your teacher is talking about the molar mass of elements that are diatomic; i.e., two or more atoms to the molecule. For example, O2 is oxygen = 32 (16 x 2)
    O3 is ozone = 48 (16 x 3)
    N2, F2, Cl2, Br2, I2, H2, are done the same way. P is P4 and S is S8 in the elemental state. I think most, if not all, of the remaining elements are single atoms to the molecule.

  • Chemistry - ,

    I should have said "polyatomic" or "multiatomic" instead of diatomic. N2, I2, H2, and most of the others I listed are diatomic. Of course, you realize O3, ozone, is triatomic, P4 is tetratomic, and S8 is what? Octatomic?

  • Chemistry - ,

    Oh Okay. I get it!! thank you so much!!

  • Chemistry - ,

    You're quite welcome. Glad to be of help.

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