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chemistry

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ohh im sorry i also have another problem i don't understand.

"A rectangular solid measures 1.0 m by 5.6 cm by 2.1 dm. Express its volume in cubic meters, liters, cubic inches, and cubic feet."

i don't even know what dm means !
Someoneee please help me!

  • chemistry -

    Here's the definition of dm.

    http://www.answers.com/topic/decimeter-decimetre-dm

    Check your text materials for these conversions.

  • chemistry -

    thanks!
    but what about the problem?
    I still don't understand it

  • chemistry -

    Have you checked your text materials for conversions for meters, centimeters, decimeters, inches, feet, etc.?

  • chemistry -

    yes, so do i just multiply the numbers by that?

  • chemistry -

    Give it a try. We'll be glad to check your answers.

  • chemistry -

    Note to Jecce.
    You should know all of the prefixes and all of the metric conversions or have a way in your mind to figure them out. Here is a simplified table
    K = kilo
    H = hecto
    Da = deca
    unit = meter, liter, second (time), gram
    d = deci
    c = centi
    m = milli
    To change from one unit to the other just move the decimal point to the left if moving up the table and move the decimal point to the right if moving down the table. How many places do we move the decimal point? One place for each unit we move. For example, to change 120 mm to m we move up the chart 1 to centi, 1 more to deci and 1 more to m or a total of 3 places. Since we moved UP the table, we move the decimal point to the left and 120 mm becomes 0.120 m. Voila!.
    See your earlier post for a site that gives all of the prefixes.
    For conversions from metric to English, or the reverse, I remember a few conversion factors but not very many. I know there are 2.54 cm = 1 inch, 12 inches = 1 ft, 231 cubic inches = 1 gallon, 144 square inches = 1 square foot and 1728 cubic inches = 1 cubic foot.

  • chemistry -

    m = meter = length
    s = second = time
    g = gram = mass
    L = liter = volume
    Remember that 1 cc = 1 cubic centimeter = 1 milliliter = 1 mL.

  • chemistry -

    I said I left a site for you below but that was for another student. Scroll down a question or two below and find my response to Mandy. I left a site there that lists all of the prefixes.

  • chemistry -

    Thank you!
    that really cleared things up for me. I saw that website as well.

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