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Algebra

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Solving for systems of equation using the elimiation method.

3x-2y=x-6
3(x+2y)=3

  • Algebra - ,

    3x - 2y = x - 6
    3(x + 2y) = 3

    Lets rearrange the second equation
    3(x + 2y) = 3
    x + 2y = 1

    Now you have:
    3x - 2y = x - 6
    x + 2y = 1

    You want to eliminate one variable and the easiest one to do so is y. So add the two equations together like so..

    3x - 2y + x + 2y = x - 6 + 1

    Simplify..

    4x = x - 5
    3x = -5
    x = -5/3

    Plug back into one of the original equation and solve for y..

    3(-5/3) - 2y = -5/3 - 6
    -5 - 2y = -5/3 - 6
    2y = 5/3 + 1
    y = 4/3

    So x is -5/3 and y is 4/3.

  • Algebra - ,

    thank you for your response.

    I should have included the answers the book gives.

    It gives X=-7 Y=4

  • Algebra - ,

    That's not possible. x and y are the same for both those equations. Although x = -7 and y = 4 does satisfy the second equation it does not for the first one.

    3x - 2y = x - 6
    3(-7) - 2(4) = -7 - 6
    -21 - 8 = -7 - 6
    -29 = -13 ??? This is not possible so those two values cannot be x and y. Are you sure you typed the equations right? A way for the x = -7 and y = 4 to be true is if the first equation is 3x + 2y = x - 6. So it may be a typo by the book *shrug*.

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