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Posted by on Wednesday, September 26, 2007 at 5:15pm.

Suppose you have a perpendicular bisector of a chord passing through the center of a circle. The perpendicular from the center of the circle bisects the chord giving the chord two equal sides.Are the two sides guaranteed to be perpendicular??

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

  • Math- Circles - , Wednesday, September 26, 2007 at 5:19pm

    Suppose you have a perpendicular bisector of a chord passing through the center of a circle. The perpendicular from the center of the circle bisects the chord giving the chord two equal sides.Are the two sides guaranteed to be perpendicular??

    Any help would be greatly appreciated

    Your statement "Suppose you have a perpendicular bisector of a chord" passing through the center of a circle defines that the chord, or any of its segments, are perpendicular to the radius line passing through the circle's center.

  • Math- Circles - , Wednesday, September 26, 2007 at 5:29pm

    I'm confused???

  • Math- Circles - , Wednesday, September 26, 2007 at 5:31pm

    The chord is a straight line. When the bisector of the cord divides it into two equal parts, how can the two sides be perpendicular.

    Reminder: perpendicular means meeting at right angles -- like a wall meets a floor.

  • Math- Circles - , Wednesday, September 26, 2007 at 7:30pm

    Suppose you have a perpendicular bisector of a chord passing through the center of a circle. The perpendicular from the center of the circle bisects the chord giving the chord two equal sides.Are the two sides guaranteed to be perpendicular??

    I am assuming that you mean "Are the two sides guaranteed to be perpendicular to the bisector, not each other.

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