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July 22, 2014

Homework Help: english

Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, August 26, 2007 at 4:41pm.

Posted by Anonymous on Friday, August 24, 2007 at 9:42pm.
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I don't understand this question in A Raisin in the Sun, Act III, Scene I:
Q: Beneatha is particularly bitter, but Ruth defends Walter. What does Ruth say?

Possible A: Ruth said, "You didn't say nothing bad to him, did you?"
(But is that defensive though?)


Please let me know if I am on the right track. Thanks.

For Further Reading

* English - SraJMcGin, Saturday, August 25, 2007 at 10:40am

Without the text (script) itself, I can not help you. Are there any other possibilities?

o English - ineedhelp, Sunday, August 26, 2007 at 2:29pm

This is the script of Act III, Scene I. I capitalized the part I think could be the answer.
Hello. I had some free time, so I came over.

I thought I might help with the packing.

I love the look of packing crates.

The sight of a household in preparation. Movement. Progress.

- That makes me think of Africa. - Africa?

What kind of mood is this?

I thought I'd find you full of sunlight today.

Have I told you how deeply you move me?

Is something wrong?

Asagai, he gave away the money.

- Who? What? - The insurance money. My brother.

- He just gave it away. - Gave it away?

He invested with a man even Travis wouldn't have trusted...

...with his most worn-out marble.

And it's gone?

- It's gone. - I see.

I'm very sorry.

But my brother's not the one who's to blame.

By his lights, he did what made sense to him.

My mama's the crazy one.

She just handed him the money.

She just got up one fine day and just gave away my future.

Perhaps you don't see things as well as your mother does.

This is the end for me.

You know, it takes money to go to school.

What difference does it make?

Why would anybody want to be a doctor in this nutty world?

Oh, my! Aren't we full of despair?

Look here. Was it your money?

I said, was it your money that was lost?

- It belonged to all of us. - But can't this make you see?

There's something wrong when all the dreams in this house...

...depended on something that might never have happened...

...if a man had not died.

We used to say back home...

..."Accident was at the first and will be at the last...

...but a poor tree from which the fruits of life may bloom."

What is the matter with you?

My family has been wiped out.

Don't they use money where you're from?

I see only that you, with all of your keen mind...

...cannot understand the greatness of what your mother tried to do.

You're not too young to understand.

For all of her backwardness...

...she still acts, she still believes that she can change things.

So she is more of the future than you are.

But when somebody can get up in the morning...

...without consulting you, blithely hand away your future...

...then life's impossible. It's futile. It's despair.

Listen...

I'm tired of listening.

I said that you will listen.

I have a bit of a suggestion.

What?

When it's over, come home with me.

At this moment, you decide to be romantic.

Dear young creature of the New World...

...I don't mean across the city. I mean across the ocean. Home.

To Africa.

You mean to Nigeria?

"Three hundred years later, the African prince rose up out of the sea...

...and swept the maiden back across the middle passage...

...over which her ancestors had come."

- Nigeria? - Nigeria. Home.

I'll show you our mountains and our stars...

...and serve you cool drinks from gourds...

...and teach you the old songs...

...and the ways of our people.

And in time, we'll pretend that you've only been away for a day.

You're making me...

You're getting me all mixed up.

- Why? - Because.

Because too many things have happened.

Just too many things have happened.

I don't know what I feel or I think about anything at this minute.

I'm going to sit down and think.

Then I'll leave you.

Don't get up. Just sit awhile and think.

Never be afraid to sit awhile and think.

How often I have looked at you and said to myself...

..."So this is what the New World hath finally wrought."

Just look at what the New World hath wrought.

There he is. Just look at him.

There he is. Symbol of a rising class.

Entrepreneur. Titan of the system.

Did you dream of the yachts on Lake Michigan?

Did you see yourself sitting down at a conference table...

...surrounded by all the mighty bald men in America?

All halted, waiting breathless for your pronouncements on industry.

You!

Chairman of the Board!

I look at you and see the final triumph of stupidity in this world!

Who was that?

That was your husband.

- Where'd he go? - Now how do I know?

Maybe he had an appointment at U.S. Steel.

YOU DIDN'T SAY MOTHING BAD TO HIM, DID YOU?

Bad? Me say something bad to him?

I said he was a sweet kid, full of dreams.

And everything was strictly peachy-keen.

Ain't it a mess in here, though.

We better stop moping around and do some work.

All this unpacking and everything we got to do.

Where's Brother?

He can help unpack some of these crates.

And one of you better call the moving men and tell them not to come.

Tell them not to come?

No sense in having them come here and go back.

They charge us for that too.

Tell her. Tell her we can still move.

Notes ain't but 125 a month. We got four grown people in this house.

We can work. We can all work.

I'll work.

I'll work 20 hours a day...

...in all the kitchens in Chicago.

I'll strap my baby on my back if I have to.

And I'll wash all the sheets in America.

I'll scrub.

We got to go.

Got to get out of here.

Honey, please!

I see things differently now.

I been thinking about some of the things we could do...

...to kind of fix up this place some.

I seen a secondhand bureau on Maxwell Street the other night.

Fit right there.

Needs some new handles and another coat of varnish.

But could be made to look brand-new.

And Walter Lee could get some new screens...

...and put them up around the baby's bassinet.

Place'll be looking just beautiful. Make us forget trouble ever come.

Sometimes, children...

...you just got to learn when to give up some things...

...and to hold on to what you got.

- Where you been? - I made a call.

- To who? - To The Man.

- What man, baby? - Don't you know who The Man is?

The Man.

Like the fellows in the street say, The Man...

...OId Captain Charlie, Mr. Boss Man.

Lindner!

That's right. That's good.

I asked him to come over.

Why do you want to see him?

We're going to do some business with that man.

- What are you talking about? - I'm talking about life.

You always asking me to see life as it is.

I laid in there on my back today, and I saw life just like it is.

He who gets and he who don't get.

It's all divided up between the takers and the tooken.

And some of us are always being tooken.

People like Willie never get tooken.

You know why the rest of us do? Because we are mixed up.

Always looking for the right and wrong of things.

We worry and cry and stay up nights...

...trying to figure out what's right, what's wrong...

...while the takers are out there, just operating.

Taking and taking.

Willie Harris...

...don't even count.

In the big scheme of things, Willie don't even count.

But I'll say one thing:

Harris taught me how to keep my eye on what does count in this world.

Thank you, William Harris.

- What'd you call that man for? - To tell him to come to the show.

We'll put on a show for the man. Just what he wants to see.

He said them people out where you want us to move...

...are so upset they'll pay us not to come.

We told the man to get out. "Get out," we said. Lord have mercy!

What a proud bunch of people we were this afternoon.

But that was an old way of thinking.

Are you talking about taking the money?

I'm not talking. I'm telling you what'll happen.

Oh, God! Where's the bottom?

Oh, God, where's the bottom? Where is the bottom?

You and that boy want everybody to carry a flag and spear...

...and sing marching songs.

You'll spend your life looking into right and wrong.

You know what'll happen?

He is going to wake up one day locked in a dungeon.

And the takers are going to have the key.

You forget it, child. There ain't no causes!

There is only taking in this world.

He who takes the most is the smartest.

And it don't make a bit of difference how.

- You making something inside me cry. - So cry.

- Some awful pain inside me. - Don't cry. Understand.

That white man will write checks for more money than we ever had.

It's important to him, and we'll help. We're going to put on a show.

I come from five generations of people...

...that was slaves and sharecroppers.

But ain't nobody in my family...

...never took no money from nobody...

...that was a way of saying we wasn't fit to walk the earth.

We ain't never been that poor.

We ain't never been that dead inside.

We're dead now.

All the talk about dreams and sunlight that goes on in this house.

It's all dead now.

What's the matter with you?

I didn't make this world.

It was handed to me exactly like it is.

I want some yacht someday. What's wrong with that?

And I want to put some pearls on my wife's neck.

Tell me what man decides what woman should or shouldn't wear pearls?

I tell you, I'm a man!

I say I want her to wear it.

- How will you feel on the inside? - Fine.

- You won't have nothing left. - I'll feel fine.

I'll look in his eye. "All right, Mr. Charlie, Mr. Lindner.

That's your neighborhood. You got a right to keep it that way.

Just give me the money and it's yours."

And I'll feel fine. I'll say more than that. I'll say...

..."Give me the money and you won't have to live next to no stinking..."

I'll feel fine. Maybe I'll get down on my black knees.

"All right, Mr. Charlie.

All right, Mr. Great White Father.

You just give us that money!

And we won't come there and dirty up your white neighborhood!"

And I'll feel fine! Fine! Fine!

That's not a man. That's nothing but a toothless rat.

Death's done come in this house.

Done come walking in my house...

...on the lips of my children.

You were...

...what's supposed to be my beginning again.

You were...

...what's supposed to be my harvest.

How did we get to this here place?

You! Mourning your brother!

- He's no brother of mine. - What?

That individual, from this day on, is no brother of mine!

That's what I thought you said.

You feeling like you're better than he is today?

What did you tell him a minute ago? That he wasn't a man?

You give him up for me?

You done wrote his epitaph too, like the rest of the world?

Who give you the privilege?

Will you be on my side for once?

You saw what he did. You saw him down there on his knees.

Didn't you teach me to despise any man who would do that...

...who would do what he's going to do?

I taught you that.

Me and your daddy.

But I thought I taught you something else too.

I thought I taught you to love him.

Love him? There's nothing left to love.

There's always something left to love.

Have you cried for that boy today?

Not for yourself and the family because we lost the money.

I mean for him.

And what he's gone through.

And God help him.

God help him, what it's done to him.

Child, when do you think is the time to love somebody the most?

When he's done good and made things easy for everybody?

That ain't the time at all.

It's when he's at his lowest...

...and he can't believe in himself because the world's whipped him so!

When you starts measuring somebody...

...measure him right, child.

Measure him right.

You make sure that you done taken into account...

...the hills and the valleys he's come through...

...to get to wherever he is.

The moving men are downstairs. The truck pulled up.

Are they, baby?

- They're downstairs? - Hello.

Hello.

I came right over.

He's here.

I was certainly glad to hear from you people today.

Life can be so much simpler than people let it be most of the time.

Now, with whom do I negotiate?

Are you Mrs. Younger?

Or your son there?

Just some official papers, sonny.

You go on downstairs now, baby.

No, you don't. You stay right here.

And you make him understand what you're doing.

You teach him good...

...like Willie Harris taught you.

And you show him where our five generations done come to, son.

Go ahead.

Go ahead.

Mr. Lindner...

...we called you...

...me and my family...

...because we are plain people, you know?

Real plain people.

I work as a chauffeur, you know.

Most of my life.

My wife works in people's kitchens...

...and so does my mother.

I mean, we are plain people.

Mr. Younger...

My father...

My father was a laborer...

...all of his life.

And my father once...

My father once almost beat a man to death because this man...

...called him some kind of name, you know?

That's my sister.

And she...

...is going to be...

...a doctor.

- And we are very proud of that. - I'm sure...

You see, we come from a long line...

...of proud people.

This is my son.

My son.

And he makes the sixth generation...

The sixth generation of my family in this country.

And we have...

We have all thought about your offer.

And we've decided...

...to move into our house.

Because my father, he earned it...

...brick by brick.

We don't intend to cause no trouble...

...or fight no causes.

And we're going to try to be good neighbors.

That's all.

That's all we have to say.

We don't want...

...your money.

I take it, then, you've decided to occupy.

That's what the man said.

Then I appeal to you.

- You're older and wiser. - I'm afraid you don't understand.

My son said we was going to move.

And there ain't nothing left for me to say.

You know these young folks nowadays.

You can't hardly do a thing with them. Goodbye.

If you're final about it...

...there's nothing left for me to say.

I sure hope you people know what you're doing.

For goodness sake, if the moving men are here...

...let's get out of here.

Ain't it the truth? Put Travis' good jacket on him.

Fix your tie and tuck in your shirt. You look like a hoodlum.

Lord have mercy! Where's my plant?

You all start on down, children.

Now don't go empty-handed.

Where's that box with my skillets? I want to be in charge of them.

I'm going to fix us the biggest dinner we ever had tonight.

Asagai asked me to marry him today. Go with him to Africa.

You ain't old enough to marry nobody.

Darling, that ain't no bale of cotton.

I've had that chair 25 years.

I would like to be able to use it again!

I mean, he wants me to be a doctor. To go and be a doctor in Africa.

What's that about Africa?

Asagai asked me to marry him, go with him to Africa.

Girl, you'd better get them silly notions out of your head...

...and start looking for a man with some loot.

What do you have to do with who I marry?

Plenty. I'm the head of this family.

I been thinking of marrying you off to George Murchison.

George Murchison?

I wouldn't marry him if he was Adam and I was Eve.

They're something, all right, my children.

They're something, all right.

- Let's go. - I'm coming.

He come into his manhood today, didn't he?

Kind of like the rainbow after the rain.

Come on!

I'm coming. Go along, darling. I'll be right down.

What are you doing?

I'm coming!

* English - Anonymous, Sunday, August 26, 2007 at 4:40pm

Correction: "MOTHING" should be "NOTHING". Sorry.

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