Tuesday
October 21, 2014

Homework Help: business presentation

Posted by joni on Monday, February 12, 2007 at 10:52pm.

Sometimes, technology and visual aids can be more of a distraction than a helpful component to a presentation. Provide an example of this from the real world (focus on a business presentation)? How could it be changed to be more effective?



tough one

Just recently on the news and every techno-savvy cable station, the world watched as Apple Computers© Chairman and CEO Steve Jobs unveiled to the world the apple phone. Building on already existing technology that pairs mobile phone service with audio and video capabilities, Apple attempts to jump into an already jammed packed market with the weight of the ridiculously well-known Ipod’s success as the only selling point to the new phone.



While I stupidly sat and watched in anticipation, along with the rest of the world for the second coming of the Ipod, I could not help but focus on the swirling images and laser display behind Job’s back. I imagine that the so-called special effects we put on in an effort to induce the always needed assurance of up to the minute technology. I am even willing to bet that all of the “fireworks” and swirling lights are what led some of the technology-starved running to the tech stores for their phones.



What stuns me is the fact that while Steve stood facing a tremendous audience that was comprised mostly of the media, he was in essence giving a business presentation to the company’s investors as well as the consumer. Although I admit to having heard a few phrases of his phone glorifying monologue, my eyes repeatedly found themselves attracted, or should I say distracted by the visual display.



The phone remained secured in the palm of his hand while close-ups provided on discreetly placed plasma screens against the dark backdrop provided the public with the only real clear view of the phone itself. Naturally, one cannot argue with the success that Apple Computers has enjoyed as a result of the mp3 player industry, however, as a consumer I find that the focus should have been placed directly on the unit and its features. While the light show and swirling lasers may have been effective in setting up an element of anticipation prior to the presentation, allowing for their continued use during the actual presentation only enhanced to me the fact that I was just viewing a re-packaged, already existent piece of hardware. Personally, I would have preferred a more subtle approach prior to the presentation and then a lead in to the presentation that would have focused on the advantages and highlights of the product itself.

Just recently on the news and every techno-savvy cable station, the world watched as Apple Computers© Chairman and CEO Steve Jobs unveiled to the world the apple phone. Building on already existing technology that pairs mobile phone service with audio and video capabilities, Apple attempts to jump into an already jammed packed market with the weight of the ridiculously well-known Ipod’s success as the only selling point to the new phone.



While I stupidly sat and watched in anticipation, along with the rest of the world for the second coming of the Ipod, I could not help but focus on the swirling images and laser display behind Job’s back. I imagine that the so-called special effects we put on in an effort to induce the always needed assurance of up to the minute technology. I am even willing to bet that all of the “fireworks” and swirling lights are what led some of the technology-starved running to the tech stores for their phones.



What stuns me is the fact that while Steve stood facing a tremendous audience that was comprised mostly of the media, he was in essence giving a business presentation to the company’s investors as well as the consumer. Although I admit to having heard a few phrases of his phone glorifying monologue, my eyes repeatedly found themselves attracted, or should I say distracted by the visual display.



The phone remained secured in the palm of his hand while close-ups provided on discreetly placed plasma screens against the dark backdrop provided the public with the only real clear view of the phone itself. Naturally, one cannot argue with the success that Apple Computers has enjoyed as a result of the mp3 player industry, however, as a consumer I find that the focus should have been placed directly on the unit and its features. While the light show and swirling lasers may have been effective in setting up an element of anticipation prior to the presentation, allowing for their continued use during the actual presentation only enhanced to me the fact that I was just viewing a re-packaged, already existent piece of hardware. Personally, I would have preferred a more subtle approach prior to the presentation and then a lead in to the presentation that would have focused on the advantages and highlights of the product itself.

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